Teacher pupil relationship stories and advice

Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

teacher pupil relationship stories and advice

Advice. Sexual health help and advice · Long-distance relationships · Fashion and One of my maths teachers was supposed to be 'tutoring' a student but really about in the Mirror (y'know those little stories down the side of the page. . I agree that most student-teacher relationships are wrong but, after. their guidance and steadfast support throughout this doctoral process. They, too, have been Perspectives of Teacher-Student Relationships 21 vi. Strategies for Teachers to Develop Positive Relationships With Students . Stories allow students to make real-life connections to the concepts.

All quite innocent, you know, but very, very personal. The girls were all wildly apologetic afterwards, but I'm not at all sure they thought they'd really done anything wrong. It was a lesson to me, though. I'm very, very careful what I say and do now. In the event, nothing was ever said, but it made me think. We're in a different situation these days.

Last week, it was the turn of Christopher Reen, a classroom supervisor who became the fifth member of staff in three years at his school to face criminal charges over a sexual relationship with a pupil.

teacher pupil relationship stories and advice

In both cases, mobile phone text messages — allegedly, in the case of Reen and a year-old pupil at Headlands school in Bridlington, Yorkshire, more than of them — were submitted in court as evidence of the offence.

But behind these headline-grabbing scandals lies a more mundane reality for teachers today, which, while it cannot excuse such incidents, may perhaps go part of the way to explaining them: Once upon a time, teachers simply did not exist outside school. There was a fixed distance; a clear definition of roles; lines that should not and, more often than not, could not be crossed. Now, contact outside the classroom is not only easier but, in many schools, actively encouraged — school web portals on which teachers and students can upload and download assignments, email each other questions and answers, post announcements and sometimes even chat in real time, are increasingly becoming the norm.

Blurred boundaries for teachers | Education | The Guardian

That fixed distance is shortening; those old boundaries — between professional and private, home and school, formal and informal — are blurring. It has been illegal in Britain since for a teacher to engage in sexual activity with any pupil at their school under the age of But despite a recent YouGov survey of 2, adults claiming that one in six people know someone who had an "intimate relationship" with a teacher while at school, teachers stress that the number of cases that ever go as far as court is tiny, and the number that end up in a conviction tinier still.

The NASUWT says it deals with about allegations of misconduct against its members each year, but only five or six involving inappropriate sexual contact most concern alleged physical abuse.

As obviously inexcusable as they are, however, some teachers feel the intense media and public focus on a small number of high-profile cases such as those of Goddard and Reen — or, to take two more, Jenine Saville-King, a Watford teaching assistant cleared two years ago of sexual activity after exchanging pages of MSN messages in three months and text messages in four days with a year-old pupil, and Madeleine Martin, a religious education teacher from Manchester, who this month admitted an eight-day affair with a year-old boy from her school whom she first arranged to meet on Facebook — may be missing a much broader point.

That's always happened, and I imagine it always will. Electronic media certainly gives greater access. But while it may also give the illusion of creating a private space, it's also written evidence. There is definitely an issue here, though. Electronic communication is different. And while schools are creating web portals and actively encouraging online contact between staff and pupils, there are all sorts of guidelines warning us never ever to use Facebook with students, or to give out our personal mobile phone numbers or email addresses.

The trouble is, it's very easy for the lines to get blurred.

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Public and private space get muddied. So what do you do? You don't want to risk losing the kids, so you give them your own mobile number.

And once that's happened, once a number is out there.

teacher pupil relationship stories and advice

And emails, too; I've sent personal emails to sixth-formers wishing them luck with their exam the next day. You can't be a jobsworth these days. An email or text is very much a one-to-one thing; a pupil might feel specially valued.

Even on the school site, I could be marking online, live, maybe quite late in the evening. I could have had a glass of wine. I could start discussing work with a student who's also online. It's Facebook by another name, really. You could easily make comments you'd regret. Digital communication is a two-way street.

Phil Ryan, a now-retired science teacher from Liverpool, briefly became an unlikely — and, as far as he was concerned, unwished-for — internet sensation last year when mobile phone footage of him doing the funky chicken for a sixth-form class on the last day of term was posted on YouTube and attracted more than 5, viewings and plenty of adverse comments within days. Ideally, children would hear this from their parents, but the sad truth is that is not always the case.

Teachers have the unique opportunity and privilege to communicate daily to a number of students that they believe in them. What a gift to be able to be that significant adult in even one student's life. Using this strategy might lead a teacher to say this to a student: You've been working very hard on remembering to write down your thinking as you solve math problems, and I know you can transfer that skill to this test.

I'll check back with you later. Once again, this is a positive relations strategy as well as an instructional strategy. You can also let students know that you have positive expectations for them by referring to past successes Kerman et al.

When you tell a student that you know he will behave appropriately at recess because he was successful yesterday, you help build confidence in the student and increase his chance for success. And after a student demonstrates good behavior or academic achievement in a specific situation, telling her you knew she would be successful Kerman et al.

Students need to know that their teachers respect them and have confidence in them. Using these different strategies to consistently communicate your positive expectations will work wonders. We challenge you to begin using one or two of these strategies today to build high expectations and positive teacher-student relations.

Correcting Students in a Constructive Way Correcting and disciplining students for inappropriate behaviors is a necessary and important part of every teacher's job. However, it doesn't have to be a negative part of your job.

Chapter 1. Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

In fact, you can actually build positive relationships when you correct students. If you don't believe this, think for just a minute about students you have had in the past who came back to school to visit you. Often it is the students who were the most challenging and with whom you had to spend the most time who continue to visit you over the years. This is due to the positive relationships you developed with them.

The goal in correcting students should be to have them reflect on what they did, be sorry that they disappointed you, and make a better choice in the future. I'm going to be sure I don't get caught next time.

If you allow students to keep their dignity, you increase the chance that they will reflect on their behavior and choose their behaviors more wisely in the future.

The correction process will be counterproductive if students are corrected in a manner that communicates bitterness, sarcasm, low expectations, or disgust. The goal is to provide a quick, fair, and meaningful consequence while at the same time communicating that you care for and respect the student.

teacher pupil relationship stories and advice

Steps to Use When Correcting Students Review what happened Identify and accept the student's feelings Review alternative actions Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation Let the student know that all students are treated the same Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future Imagine that Johnny hit Sam because Sam called his mother a name.

This is how you could put these disciplinary steps in place: Discuss the incident with Johnny. Begin with fact finding to be sure that you are appropriately correcting the student.

The worst way to affect teacher-student relationships is to unfairly discipline a student. Identify and accept the student's feelings. Tell Johnny that you understand why it upset him to hear somebody call his mother a name and that you, too, would be upset if someone maligned your mother.

It's important to understand that this step communicates that you respect and understand his feelings but that you are not accepting his actions. Go over with Johnny the different actions he could have taken, such as ignoring the remark or reporting it to a teacher. Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation. Remind Johnny of the building policy of not fighting and that the rule is if anyone hits another student, he or she will be sent to the office and possibly be suspended from school.

Let the student know that all students are treated the same. Make sure that Johnny understands that all students must adhere to the policy and that any student who disregards the rule will suffer the consequences. Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence. Communicate with the office about what happened and send Johnny to the office. Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action.

Tell Johnny that you are disappointed that his actions have led to this situation. Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future. Remind Johnny that, although you do not approve of his actions and do not like to send him or any student to the office, you like him and know that he will make a better choice next time.

Also tell him that you are there to support him and work through these issues with him in the future. In addition to your following these steps when correcting a student, it is important to keep some key philosophical precepts in mind.